Aging Without Grace, by Sandra Fox Murphy

You need to be strong to read these powerful poems, but they are worth the journey along the course of aging. The title of the collection may be Aging Without Grace, but the poems carry a special grace. It is the grace of truthfulness captured in stunning images such as, “Now your vacant chair sighs when I pass by,” in “When You Lay Dying.”

The poems also touch the sensitivity of all ages as when a woman visiting the grave of a friend thinks of “The day when a friend might visit me,” in “The Shift of Time.”

Each piece in this startling collection of poems captures touchable shifts of time. Aging Without Grace illuminates Nobel Prize winner Salvatore Quasimodo’s definition of poetry as “the revelation of a feeling that the poet believes to be interior and personal which the reader recognizes as their own.”
                           

~ Anna M. Carroll,
author of the poetry collections Gulag and Pieces of a Thief

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