They Are Almost Invisible, by Elizabeth Carmer

They Are Almost Invisible is a collection of poems written about childhood and the transition to adulthood, with special focus on adolescence, that strange time lost in between. At times serious, at times comic, and always a bit pleasantly eccentric, this new collection from Elizabeth Carmer is endlessly surprising.

As readers, we are lucky that Carmer’s They Are Almost Invisible, along with her other new book, Halfway Friends for Decades, introduce us to a startlingly different and exciting new voice in contemporary American poetry.

A native of Syracuse, New York, Elizabeth Carmer earned bachelor’s degrees in both Art History and Spanish from the University of Vermont, where she spent time abroad honing her language skills and researching for her future writing. After graduating, Carmer began a career in public health, working as an administrative assistant at a community health center in New Hampshire. Having volunteered internationally and locally for community and women’s health organizations, including a domestic violence office and Planned Parenthood, as well as a political campaign, Carmer uses her love of writing to harness in her poems a keen eye for culture, politics, place, and the world around her. Her poems are reflective and autobiographical in nature, and outward-facing in thematic scope.

Currently, Carmer spends her time out of work writing and engaging her passion for photography. Halfway Friends for Decades is her first work.  They Are Almost Invisible is her second piece of work.

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